01 Features

Scientists Create the World’s First Organism – PhoneWorld Magazine

From PhoneWorld Magazine – 
It is for the very first time that scientists have created a life with a genetic code that was developed from scratch.
No doubt, it was a stunning scientific feat. The artificial E-coli holds 4 million base pair of DNA code. It took scientists over a year to just read the entire DNA code. So why is this such an important breakthrough?
Traditionally, E-coli is used to make compounds for drugs to treat cancer, heart attacks, and multiple sclerosis. However, as soon as natural E-coli is contaminated with bacteria, it’s useless to doctors. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Black Holes Ain’t All, Says Science

Times of India – Black holes, known for their intense gravitational pull capable of gobbling up entire stars, may have significantly weaker magnetic fields than previously thought, a study has found.  A 64-kilometre-wide black hole 8,000 light years from Earth named V404 Cygni has yielded the first precise measurements of the magnetic field that surrounds the deepest wells of gravity in the universe. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

The Ice Cream Coning of the New Flu Vaccine Strategy

At first, I thought this headline, the headline from futurity, “Ice Cream” Method could create lifetime flue vaccine” as Ice Cream could create….yeah…Ice Cream Vaccine.  But, alas, it is this, using the model of the cone that hold that different flavors of ice cream as a way to build a ‘root’ of vaccine protections that can be supplemented every year with different ‘ice cream flavors’ or, different particular variations of the strains that the cone fundamentally has covered, so to speak. 

Here’s Futurity- – The new method teaches the body to recognize the “cone” portion of the virus—the part that stays the same year-to-year. Researchers working on the technique say it works in lab animals, but warn they still need to make the vaccine more specific and show it works in much larger studies before testing it in people.  “We think it could be very generalizable,” says Peter Kim, professor of biochemistry at Stanford University and the lead investigator of the infectious disease initiative at the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub. “It could be important for coming up with a universal flu vaccine that would protect against pandemic flu, as well as for HIV.” | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Fecal transplants may be best answer to antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Science Daily – Transplanting human donor fecal microbiota into the colon of a patient infected with Clostridiodes difficile (C. diff) may be the best treatment for those not helped by C. diff targeted antibiotics, according to an article in the Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.  C. diff is the most common healthcare-acquired infection in the United States. It affects nearly half a million patients each year and becomes a recurring infection for nearly a third of them. If untreated, C. diff can lead to sepsis and death. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Babies Get Two Paths, Fix the Wall or BE the Wall – The Life of Aphids

Science News – Colonies of tiny Nipponaphis monzeni aphids in eastern Asia use their own young as part repair crew, part repair goo. The tiny fluffs of juvenile insects end up dying after gushing white glop from their bodies to repair a hole in the wall protecting their colony in Asian winter hazel trees. New details of this patching chemistry suggest that these doomed young aphids are a colony’s version of immune system cells, researchers report April 15 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Pole-To-Pole Survey Reveals The Oceans Teem With Viruses

Discover Magazine – The oceans are crawling with viruses. An international team of researchers surveyed the world’s oceans from pole to pole, sampling the waters for the microorganisms and they found nearly 200,000 of them…..“This new understanding of viruses … may help scientists better understand how the oceans will behave under the pressures of climate change,” Ahmed Zayed, a graduate student in microbiology at the Ohio State University in Columbus, who authored the new research, said in a statement | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Beer Was the Stuff of Life, Literally, for this Ancient Peruvian Civilization

Discover Magazine – Five hundred years before the Incan empire reached its height in South America, a different civilization reigned: the Wari.  One of the Wari’s claims to fame is that they were early brewers of a drink called chicha….

New evidence, recently published in the journal Sustainability, suggests  this beer relative may have played a role in keeping Wari civilization together. Not only that, but researchers started to figure out their ancient beer recipe — and they’ve re-created it for us to taste. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Rescuing Eggs from Dead Sharks Yields Live Sharks, Hope for Endangered Species

The Guardian – All of this work has culminated in our recent publication of a paper in the journal of Ocean and Coastal Management, detailing the project. To date, a total of 689 eggcases have been recovered from dead sharks at the market; of these, 278 have developed and hatched out successfully with 237 S. canicula and 41 S. stellarisreleased back into the wild. A further four S. stellariswere retained by the aquarium for educational display purposes. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Snake Uses Spider Lure Tail to Snag Wanna-Be-Spider Eaters

From Discover Magazine -When Steven Anderson first examined a specimen of the Iranian spider-tailed viper, he, of course, noticed the arachnid-shaped lump on the dead snake’s tail.  It was 1970….“All of a sudden, a few years ago this Iranian amateur naturalist Hamid Bostanchi found another one,” says Anderson…..”And so then I realized there is something going on here.” …..the snake’s weird accessory was a caudal lure — an aggressive form of animal mimicry where a tail evolves to resemble the prey of another organism. When something like, say a frog, tries to gobble this fake food, it becomes food itself. In this case, the spider-tailed viper uses its caudal lure to capture birds…..” | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

3D-Printed Hearts Could One Day Replace Transplants from Donors

Israeli scientists have managed to create the first ever 3-D Printed heart with fully functioning blood vessels.  The heart itself won’t save your life, but it may very well lead to one that does.

From Huffpost – Scientists at Israel’s Tel Aviv University say they’ve created the world’s first 3D-printed heart with human tissue and blood vessels.   Although the organ is only as big as a rabbit’s heart, the researchers are hoping the technology could one day be developed enough to help human patients in need of a heart transplant.    Lead researcher Tal Dvir said that while other scientists have managed to 3D-print the structure of a heart in the past, this is the first time anyone has printed an entire heart “replete with cells, blood vessels, ventricles and chambers.” | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Mouse Brains Might Prove Overeating Is LITERALLY ALL in the Mind- LITERALLY

Discover Magazine – Now, a new discovery by a team of scientists at the University of North Carolina (UNC) School of Medicine may help explain why so many of us can’t resist polishing off a jumbo bag of chips or a carton of ice cream in one sitting – even if we know it’s not a good idea.  A new paper published this week in Neuron, explains that a specific brain circuit found in mammal brains seems to be involved in our urge to overeat tasty, calorie rich food. The researchers think this brain circuit essentially overrides the signals that our body and brain send to tell us to stop eating — and instead drives us to keep gorging after we’re full, consuming extra calories in the process. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Tiny Army of Micro-Robots Will Soon Clean Your Teeth

Science Daily – What if, instead, a dentist could deploy a small army of tiny robots to precisely and non-invasively remove that buildup?  A team of engineers, dentists, and biologists from the University of Pennsylvania developed a microscopic robotic cleaning crew. With two types of robotic systems — one designed to work on surfaces and the other to operate inside confined spaces — the scientists showed that robots with catalytic activity could ably destroy biofilms, sticky amalgamations of bacteria enmeshed in a protective scaffolding. | go to source

01 Features

Pig Hearts Power Pacemakers, and Humans Might Soon Be Next

Using the power of your own heart, you might one day be able to sustain devices that will keep your heart going, using your own heart’s power.  The devices are pacemakers, and a battery-free version of one just passed some early tests on pigs.  New Scientist has more deets:  A battery-free pacemaker that harvests energy from heartbeats has been successfully tested in pigs. It uses an energy harvester wrapped around the heart that generates electricity from movement….In tests, Wang and his colleagues found that the energy they harvested from the heart was higher than that needed for a human pacemaker. They used pigs in the tests because their hearts are about the same size as those of humans. | go to source

No Picture
01 NewsFire

Twitter and Trump Meet, Literally, Behind Closed Doors, Dorsey to Donald

Motherboard – Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, along with other Twitter executives, is having a closed-door meeting with President Donald Trump on Tuesday, according to an internal Twitter email obtained by Motherboard from two independent sources. The meeting comes after an invitation from the White House, the email adds….The meeting lasted 30 minutes, and touched on “the health of the public conversation on Twitter,” according to an internal Twitter email obtained by Motherboard. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Offers Great Promise

From Times of India – Researchers have identified a novel regulatory mechanism, which when deactivated, results in the death of tuberculosis pathogen, an advance that could pave the way for new drugs to prevent the life-threatening disease. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

8 Million Year Old Proto-Human Remains Found in Europe

From Big Think – The jaw bones of an 8-million-year-old ape were discovered at Nikiti, Greece, in the ’90s.  Researchers speculate it could be a previously unknown species and one of humanity’s earliest evolutionary ancestors.  These fossils may change how we view the evolution of our species. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

The Methane Origin Story Gets a Life Hack Update

Discover Magazine – Scientists call this kind of methane “abiotic” because it can happen without any lifeforms present. And scientists are finding more and more of it, researchers announced Monday. What’s more, they’ve also discovered that some of sources of suspected abiotic methane are actually also created with help from life. | go to source

No Picture
01 PGN Posts

Indonesians Use Tiny Satellites to Track Illegal Fishing Boats

The Indonesian government is using tiny internet-providing satellites to check if boats in the middle of the ocean are fishing legally….Perched on a desk in front of me is a tiny satellite. Four black panels stick out like the spokes of a windmill, connected to central body the size of a desktop computer. It weighs less than 10 kilograms, and looks like a space buff’s toy.  Suspended precariously on a metal rod, it’s hard to imagine a satellite just like this is hurtling around Earth, at an altitude of 600 kilometres.  –  New Scientist | go to source

01 Features

Anti-Aging Pill Company Begins Long-Term Testing

Neurohacker Collective is claiming to have created an anti-aging pills that solves the “healthy aging puzzle.”  Concentrating on manipulating cellular and mitochondrial functions in consideration of the network structures they comprise, the company believes they can reverse the aging process.  Here’s more from Scientific American
Neurohacker Collective uses the idea of a “healthy aging puzzle” as a way to fit together what are often treated as isolated pieces of cellular and mitochondrial function into a bigger picture of how these things work together. Mitochondrial networks produce about our body weight of cellular energy (i.e., ATP) every day. Cells use this energy to do the work they need to clean up damage and do many other important jobs. A molecule called NAD+ is used to make ATP; it’s also used to activate sirtuins (a cellular stress sensing pathway) and to promote DNA repair. The food we eat is converted into ATP by several linked pathways. Hormones tell groups of cells how to respond together. Our body clock influences what cellular and mitochondrial processes are given preference at different times of the day and night. Health doesn’t happen because of any of these pieces in isolation; it’s a result of all of them happening together.  – Scientific American | go to source